Whats your inner ninja like?
How do you use it to overcome your obstacles and hardships?
Fun song to remind ourselves of our inner strengths.
 
 
 
 
Do you look over your shoulder to see who is watching, screening, judging and scrutinizing you???
Does that matter to you so much that you lose focus and confidence in your ability to express yourself and live how "you" to choose to live?

Why?

Stay true to yourself and things usually work out.  Having said that, outcomes usually depend on the individuals positive or negative outlook on life and its situations.



 
 
GEORGE CARLIN  American comedic icon (His wife recently died...and George followed her, soon after dying in July
2008)

A Message by George Carlin:

The paradox of our time in history is that we have taller buildings but
shorter tempers, wider Freeways , but narrower viewpoints. We spend more, but
have less, we buy more, but enjoy less. We have bigger houses and smaller
families, more conveniences, but less time. We have more degrees but less
sense, more knowledge, but less judgment, more experts, yet more problems,
more medicine, but less wellness.

We drink too much, smoke too much, spend too recklessly, laugh too little,
drive too fast, get too angry, stay up too late, get up too tired, read too
little, watch TV too much, and pray too seldom.

We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values. We talk too much,
love too seldom, and hate too often.

We've learned how to make a living, but not a life. We've added years to life
not life to years. We've been all the way to the moon and back, but have
trouble crossing the street to meet a new neighbour. We conquered outer space
but not inner space. We've done larger things, but not better things.

We've cleaned up the air, but polluted the soul. We've conquered the atom, but
not our prejudice. We write more, but learn less. We plan more, but accomplish
less. We've learned to rush, but not to wait. We build more computers to hold
more information, to produce more copies than ever, but we communicate less
and less.

These are the times of fast foods and slow digestion, big men and small
character, steep profits and shallow relationships. These are the days of two
incomes but more divorce, fancier houses, but broken homes. These are days of
quick trips, disposable diapers, throwaway morality, one night stands,
overweight bodies, and pills that do everything from cheer, to quiet, to kill.
It is a time when there is much in the showroom window and nothing in the
stockroom.

Remember; spend some time with your loved ones, because they are not going to
be around forever.

Remember, say a kind word to someone who looks up to you in awe, because that
little person soon will grow up and leave your side.

Remember, to give a warm hug to the one next to you, because that is the only
treasure you can give with your heart and it doesn't cost a cent.

Remember, to say, ' I love you ' to your partner and your loved ones, but most
of all mean it. A kiss and an embrace will mend hurt when it comes from deep
inside of you.

Remember to hold hands and cherish the moment for someday that person will not
be there again.

Give time to love, give time to speak! And give time to share the precious
thoughts in your mind.

AND ALWAYS REMEMBER:

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that
take our breath away.

---George Carlin---
 
 
WOW!!!

What an amazing and wonderful warm feeling when you get to see your newborn coming out straight from the womb and saying hi to the world for the first time.



 
 
This is so awesome. Please take a moment to read:

A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that 1,100 people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.

Three minutes went by, and a middle aged man noticed there was musician playing. He slowed his pace, and stopped for a few seconds, and then hurried up to meet his schedule.

A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping, and continued to walk.

A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again. Clearly he was late for work.

The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried, but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally, the mother pushed hard, and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on.

In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money, but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.

No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the most talented musicians in the world. He had just played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, on a violin worth $3.5 million dollars.

Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100.

This is a real story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste, and priorities of people. The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour: Do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context?

One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be:

If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?

==========> DARE TO SHARE! <============


.
By: Guillo Puig

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Vinny's Thoughts:

Have we become a "SadCiety" where we are too jaded and too inundated with information that we have totally shut off our filtration for appreciating beautiful creative art?

Are we that busy every second in which we have no time to "STOP" and appreciate the simple/finer things in life?

What has happened?
How did it happen?

What have you done in your daily routines to help recognize that:

~Connecting with friends and family is important?
~Having a walk in the park, on the beach or anywhere else can give you peace of mind?
~Enjoying an engaging conversation can be inspiring and invigorating?
~Just to stop and breathe can be calming to the mind, body and soul?

Its a rainy day in Vancouver everyone....perfect day to do all of the above...(yes walking in the rain can be the most fun ever) :-)
 
 
Its beautiful to see creativity, synchronicity and energy just flow.

 
 
How are you maintaining or increasing your levels of happiness?

How often do you:

Show Gratitude

Use a journal

Exercise

Meditate

Show Random Acts Of Kindness


If your answer is not often enough...then today is your day to get starting.  It is never too late.  It is only too late when you are 90yrs old and thinking back with regrets.
Live Now!
Be Happy Now!
There is no reason to wait.

 

This is your LIFE

02/07/2012

 
This happens to be a company's manifesto but it was created before the company was formed, which means it came from the heart and the author's meant every word.

What would your manifesto be if you would write one for yourself?
What brings joy into your life?
What makes you most happy?
How would you want to live your life?

 
 
_
Found this piece quite funny and sad at the same time.  Enjoy!

The Green Thing
Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the older woman that she should bring her own grocery bags because plastic bags weren't good for the environment.The woman apologized and explained, "We didn't have this green thing back in my earlier days."
The clerk responded, "That's our problem today. Your generation didn’t care enough to save our environment for future generations."
She was right --our generation didn't have the green thing in its day.

Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they were really recycled.  But we didn't have the green thing back in our day.

We walked up stairs, because we didn't have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn't climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks. But she was right. We didn't have the green thing in our day.

Back then, we washed the baby's diapers because we didn't have the  throw-away  kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy gobbling machine burning up 220 volts -- wind and solar power really did  dry our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing. But that young lady is right. We didn't have the green thing back in our day.

Back then, we had one TV, or radio, in the house, not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Montana. In the kitchen, we blended and stirred by hand because we didn't have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap. Back then, we didn't fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn't need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity. But she's right. We didn't have the green thing back then.

We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled  writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull. But we didn't have the green thing back then.

Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus, and kids rode their bikes to  school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service. We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn't need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 2,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest pizza joint.

But isn't it sad the current generation has to lament how wasteful we old folks were because we didn't have the green thing back then?  Please forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a lesson in conservation from a smartass young person.
Remember:  Don't make old people mad.
We don't like being old in the first place, so it doesn't take much to pi.. us off.